children

Playgrounds play a great part in the development of a child, the memories in a play park are often ones that are remembered. They’re the place where we play and explore risk, socialise with others and create memories that we will treasure long into adult life — but what happens when the risk becomes all too much? Retailers of lawn top dressing and play bark, Compost Direct have provided us with some research on playground safety and some suggestions on how to improve the levels of safety in a play area.

 

Geoff Jones, parent communications expert at ParentMail, identifies some improvements schools could make when keeping in touch with parents…

Thankfully, home-school communications have evolved out of all recognition since the days of the crumpled letter at the bottom of the book bag. But although schools are working hard to improve the way they reach out to parents, their messages don’t always hit home.

So where could you be going wrong with your school communications?

1. Irrelevant messages

Eleanor Baggaley is using her life experiences to help children and their parents to deal with maths, self-confidence and goal-setting

When Eleanor Baggaley received inspiration from two special people in her life, she didn't realise that her journey was about to take her away from mainstream maths education to a life of self-employment, book writing and empowering children through her experiences. But now Eleanor has one children's book published and has two more in the pipeline, all three named after her own children, Maya, Oscar and Ava.

Lucie Parkes, formal learning manager at the Historic Royal Palaces highlights the impact of music  for boosting self-confidence and  learning across the curriculum.  

NOW that children are back to school, Manchester opticians are raising awareness of the importance of good vision to children’s education.

Good eyesight is vital for children as their vision helps them explore and concentrate.

In fact, up to 80 per cent of everything learned at school is presented visually, so being able to see clearly is crucial for children’s overall development.

Award-winning classroom resources created by the team at The Week Junior are now available for teachers, librarians and other school staff to download for free.

The new resource bank on The Week Junior’s website for schools is designed to help teaching staff save time and money. ­

Toy and book seller OnBuy.com took to analysing 2018 reading data from YouGov* to determine which classic books are no longer cherished, and which 21st century children’s classics may replace forgotten titles in 2018.

OnBuy found Robert Louis Stephenson’s timeless classic Treasure Island has seen the steepest decline in readership of all the books listed by 6-17-year-olds – with as little as 19% choosing to pick up the title. Overall, half of adults (49%) have read the book – including 80% of those aged over 65 and 73% of those aged 55-64.

Review: Children’s Meditations In My Heart, by Gitte Winter Graugaard (£14.95, Room For Reflection Publishing)

With test season in full swing, the importance of pupils getting a good night’s sleep is paramount. But worries about school, friends, arguments and all the other stresses which feature in everyday life can prevent children from nodding off. 

As the sugar tax comes into force, today results from the 2018 Child Measurement Programme (CMP) Annual Report show that childhood obesity has increased over the past two years.

Latest data shows more than one in four children assessed were overweight or obese in 2016/17. With the gap in levels of childhood obesity now 6.2 per cent between those living in the most disadvantaged areas (14.9 per cent) and the least disadvantaged (8.7 per cent).

Having access to discover, learn and play outdoors is surely an essential part of childhood.

A survey of over 1000 school children and teachers revealed that 85% of school children want to spend more time outside in nature and four out of five teachers want to spend more time teaching outside.