Canva for Education growth fuels $6B valuation

Canva for Education, the free design and collaboration platform for schools that launched at the start of 2020, has seen its total monthly active users increase tenfold since March, highlighting how the tool has played a key role in keeping education alive during lockdown across the world. With the average Canva classroom designing 9.6 times more content  than they were pre-lockdown, equating to more than 800 designs being created every hour, education institutions around the globe are reaping the benefits of adopting Canva to power rich online project- and inquiry-based learning.


There are now people across 90,000 schools and universities globally, using Canva every month; such a positive result has not only played a significant part in the organization’s recent valuation at US$6billion, it also reaffirms the valuable role Canva plays in leading the charge for the future of education - regardless of whether that takes place in a digital or tangible format.

Canva for Education
Canva for Education, an entirely free offering for students and teachers worldwide, uses Canva’s intuitive drag-and-drop design tools millions have come to know and love. Tailored to the needs and requirements of schools worldwide, Canva’sEducation platform empowers users to design education-specific content such as worksheets, lesson plans, how-to videos, infographics and presentations - just to name a few, through to an all-new collaboration space, a review workflow, version history plus much more; it is a one-stop-shop for creating and collaborating in the classroom.


Georgia Vidler, Director of Product at Canva commented, “The Canva platform is driven by one simple belief; technology should break down barriers, not build them, something that has been more essential than ever during lockdown. The ability to interpret, communicate and present ideas visually is critical for students to thrive in today’s world and prepare themselves to be the leaders of tomorrow. We’re proud of the way we have been able to help classes work together, even when they’re apart.”
 

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