Ofsted head criticises 'one size fits all' education system

Ofsted head, Sir Michael Wilshaw has criticised the ‘one size fits all’ secondary education system, which he said is letting down students.

The chief inspector of schools believes the lack of high-calibre vocational training for those who don’t choose the university route is one of the reasons for the UK’s record on youth unemployment. He says the ‘one size fits all’ system lets down less academic pupils and the education system in England, as it stands, does not offer enough opportunities for those who do not succeed at GCSEs to set them up for the world of work.

In his address on Monday to the CentreForum education thinktank, Sir Michael Wilshaw is expected to call for a more “inclusive” approach to education.

Michael Mercieca, CEO of Young Enterprise said: “I welcome Sir Michael Wilshaw’s argument that the ‘one size fits all’ education system doesn’t benefit all young people.

"Less academic young people should not be left behind, and we agree that education provision for children who do not get C grades or above at GCSE, or who don’t want to pursue an academic path, needs improving.

“A strong academic curriculum is important, but we also need to think outside of academia and consider those key skills which all young people need to develop for when they do enter the world of work, such as resilience, confidence and communication. Surveys carried out by organisations such as the CBI and Pearson, and the British Chambers of Commerce have found that businesses place a strong emphasis on the key skills young people have.

"These skills are even more important for those who don’t have a strong academic record, as they complement academic learning and can improve results later on if developed from a young age.”

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