Tassomai to launch personalised intervention videos

From September, schools working with Tassomai will have access to a suite of 150 videos designed to target gaps in knowledge identified by their use of the program. The Tassomai algorithm automatically identifies students’ weaknesses and picks out a video targeted at helping them.

- Tassomai to launch personalised intervention videos for students with knowledge gaps in science

- Research project shows significant impact on knowledge recall and retention amongst GCSE science students

From September, schools working with Tassomai will have access to a suite of 150 videos designed to target gaps in knowledge identified by their use of the program. The Tassomai algorithm automatically identifies students’ weaknesses and picks out a video targeted at helping them.

- GCSE students struggling to understand specific science concepts will be able to fill in the knowledge gaps by watching short video clips aimed at helping them learn and retain information

- The videos are being launched by Tassomai, an educational technology company that uses quiz-based on-line learning. It is currently used by 100,000 students in more than 450 schools across the UK 

Boy in Science Class after watching personalised intervention videosFrom September, schools working with Tassomai will have access to a suite of 150 videos designed to target gaps in knowledge identified by their use of the program. The Tassomai algorithm automatically identifies students’ weaknesses and picks out a video targeted at helping them.

The addition of video content comes about after evidence showed it to have a significant impact on a students’ knowledge, recall and memory retention. In a research project overseen by academics from University College London and the Institute of Education’s UCL EDUCATE programme, the team measured the impact of brief, targeted intervention videos on short and long-term attainment.

When quizzed on a topic, GCSE science students who had been shown a related video subsequently answered correctly 70.7% of the time, compared to 27.6% for the control group that had not seen the video. All the students who answered correctly were questioned on the same topic a week later. Those that had originally watched the video answered correctly 52.3% of the time, compared to 41.5% for the control group: a 10% uplift in long term recall.

Murray Morrison, the creator of Tassomai, said: “Because Tassomai’s algorithm is able to really identify weak areas we knew we had the potential to do something that was really targeted and focused towards the learner. “These short videos are digestible and accessible for each student and crucially, unlike other video based tools, Tassomai only shows videos to students when a weakness has been identified through their usage of the program.”

Alison Clark-Wilson, EDUCATE’s principal research lead, said: “This is a fantastic example of what we on the EDUCATE programme set out to achieve, which is working with EdTech companies to help them to ensure they’re making evidence led design decisions such that they can gather this evidence in an academically rigorous and valid way.”

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