During SATs week, GCSEs exam period and Mental Health Awareness Week, we take a look at whether parents could pass a GCSE in science.
Parents often say "exams were harder in my day", but do they really appreciate how hard GCSEs are? And could they do better than their children? When it comes to GCSE science, it looks like the answer is a resounding no! When online learning company Tassomai asked parents to put their science knowledge to the test, they didn’t compare to their children who scored significantly higher marks.

According to a recent report published by Sir John Holman, president of the Royal Society for Chemistry, high-stake exams are preventing schools from carrying out enough practical science activities. Many have responded by highlighting the importance of practical lessons, however, perhaps we need to take it further. 

A free scheme which allows UK schoolchildren to hold a piece of outer space in their hands has undergone a major revamp and now offers exciting new teaching resources and new meteorite samples.

Executive head teacher Malcolm Drakes explains how a science resource has changed the way that the subject is being taught across Broadford Primary School…

 

“Pupils at Broadford Primary School

date
2017-10-19T01:00:00

Fifty lucky primary schools will get a spectacular science lesson delivered to their pupils absolutely free by Empiribox – creators of the only complete science solution for KS1 and KS2 that makes it easy for teachers to deliver captivating lessons designed to thrill, engage and firmly embed a love of science in their class.

Categories
date
2016-10-13T01:00:00

• Almost a third of Brits (32%) don’t believe their school education prepared them for adult life

• Computer Science, Law and Psychology are the most popular modern GCSEs adults wish they could take now

• Almost a fifth of 18% of 18-24 year olds said they strongly disagreed that school set them up well for real life

• Would You Pass quiz tests if adults could pass GCSEs in modern subjects

Categories
date
2016-08-10T01:00:00

Promising young students from around the world are being dissuaded from studying in the UK following the EU Referendum, according to research published today and undertaken by the London International Youth Science Forum (LIYSF).

A survey conducted amongst existing and previous LIYSF students, found that 90% of the 406 respondents agreed that the idea of studying in the UK was an exciting or attractive prospect, however 38% also admitted that the departure of the UK from the European Union would dissuade them from studying or working here.

Categories
date
2016-07-26T01:00:00

‘We all have a part to play in tackling the STEM skills shortage’ 

The most recent research for the Parliamentary Office of Science & Technology reported that 42 per cent of employers still have difficulties recruiting staff from science, technology, engineering and maths (STEM) backgrounds. Indeed, the STEM skills shortfall is a very real issue, and a cause for concern not only for schools, but also parents, businesses, government and policy-makers.  

Categories
date
2016-07-11T01:00:00

We can do more to nurture students’ interest and achievement in Science, Design & Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) – by showing them the exciting, real-life applications of the subjects. If we want students to be fully equipped for their futures, we need to give them grounding in these subjects and make them aware of the career choices in these fields. 

Categories

According to new findings in a report published by the Commons Science and Technology Committee, 12.6 million adults lack basic digital skills, while 5.8 million have never used the internet at all. The report warns the UK risks being left behind if the government does not take more action to address the digital skills crisis.

Categories